Cloud Expo Europe keynote: Building Great Companies on the Cloud

Yesterday I spoke at the first Cloud Computing Expo Europe and I enjoyed the conference very much. Here is my presentation:

PS. This presentation was featured today as one of the Top Presentations of the Day by Slideshare…

Looking for SOA in All the Wrong Places?

Systinet’s founding CTO and my friend Anne Thomas Manes pronounced the demise of SOA a few weeks ago. Honestly, SOA lost its meaning for me on the day when good, old Solaris became the “SOA operating system”. But is SOA dead or not? I don’t believe so but I think that Anne and others are looking for SOA in the wrong places. Here is why:

Part of our Systinet SOA pitch was this truism: “SOA is not something you can buy”. We believed that SOA didn’t come in a box and companies have to invest time and money to build it. And maybe this is the crux of the problem. What if the act of building internal service blueprint is beyond the capabilities and budgets of the individual customers? Go to the SOA mailing list and try to understand how to build your own SOA and you can spend the rest of your life reading the discussions and related blogs and comments.

Systinet SOA

My point is that IT departments will always spend most of their budgets keeping the lights on and there is not enough money left for a complete architectural redesign. And even if they decide to throw more money at it they will still not get it right because of lack of internal expertise, lack of vision and simply because it is too hard to rebuild systems that somehow “work”. Every company seems to have a set of requirements that none of the commercial products can ever satisfy and as a result the existing internal architectures are usually completely proprietary. And sediments of bad architectural decisions are nearly impossible to peel off…

Maybe it’s time to forget about this SOA delusion and look someplace else. For companies like Google, Amazon, Workday and others (including my company – Good Data) SOA is not only “yet another IT initiative” but the key differentiator that allows them to deliver a flexible and extensible set of services. And the only way IT departments will be able to “buy SOA” is to use services from the companies in the cloud. The role of proprietary internal architectures will diminish over time as companies move to an increasing number of on-demand services – and that is probably what Anne wanted to say when she declared SOA dead…

Can Cloud IP Address Be Damaged Goods?

Elasticity of the cloud computing is a wonderful idea. You can get an instance of networked computer exactly when you need it and you only pay for the time when you actually use it. But while the virtual memory and hard disk is a “clean slate” created specifically for you, the IP address assigned to your instance may have been previously used by a spammer and it could be already on a “spam blacklist”. In an extreme case the whole IP address range can be marked as a source of spam. And this is exactly what happened to Amazon’s EC2: “Go Daddy blocks links to EC2 “.

The problem is the scarcity of IP addresses — Amazon.com doesn’t have enough addresses to give every user a fresh new IP address with the new instance. And the solution to this problem is called Internet Protocol version 6/IPv6:

The very large IPv6 address space supports 2128 (about 3.4×1038) addresses, or approximately 5×1028 (roughly 295) addresses for each of the roughly 6.5 billion (6.5×109) people alive today. In a different perspective, this is 252 addresses for every observable star in the known universe – more than seventy nine billion billion billion times as many addresses as IPv4 (232) supports.

This means that there will be enough IP addresses not only for the elastic clouds but also PDAs, cell phones and other IP based clients. On the other hand it will make the “spam blacklists’ irrelevant since every piece of spam can come from a different IP address: “If the earth were made entirely out of 1 cubic millimeter grains of sand, then you could give a unique IPv6 address to each grain in 300 million planets the size of the earth” .

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,658 other followers